The Ban on Federal Funding for Needle Exchanges Puts Poor Women in Danger

Intravenous drug use has surged in the United States over the last decade. Though media narratives around the uptick tend to focus on crime rates or overdose, the risk of contracting HIV or hepatitis C through used needles is also a major public health concern. And thanks to restrictive laws and limited health-care options, halting the spread of these infections is often a losing battle—one that puts poor women in particularly high danger. Yet Congress still refuses to provide the federal funding that could be key to combating this crisis.

Many intravenous substance users are at heightened risk of contracting HIV or hepatitis C from sex work or sexual violence. According to a 2010 study by the Reference Group to the United Nations on HIV and Injecting Drug Use, between 15 and 66 percent who use injection drugs engage in sex work. Daniel Raymond, the policy director at the Oakland, California-based Harm Reduction Coalition, noted that clients often offer to pay sex workers more for unprotected sex. He also added that in some places, law enforcement can point to condoms as evidence of prostitution, which discourages sex workers from carrying them.

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